Tag Archives: Glasgow

Expanding range of Eastern and Western modals of therapy

An ever increasing diversity of models modalities of psychoanalysis

As a psychotherapist, psychoanalyst and hypnotherapist with over 25 years experience, I am of course bound to pick up more modals and methods over time simply because therapists have to do 25 hours or so continuous professional training each year.  For me though, it is about far more. Right from the start of my career I was trained in being multi-modal: being competent in more than one modal alone or in combination. So for me continuing to add modals at competence level or above is a natural thing to do.

Eastern and Western Modals, and in between

Although I started off very much with western based modals with Level 5 Diploma (Graduate level) training in Cognitive Behavioural, Hypnosis based, humanistic and Psychoanalytic, by the time I completed by second set of accreditation (post graduate) with the NACHP I was fascinated by using mindfulness and Eastern Psychology in psychotherapy.

Since then I have revived my long time interest in eastern psychology, Buddhism and Taoism (which goes back to my teens!) and completed a variety of competence and CPD courses in forms of eastern psychology, Buddhism, mindfulness and Zen based mindfulness.

I have also studied Hygge as a northern European alternative, and am currently (Nov 2018) studying Chabbad based Jewish mindfulness.

Fitting the “faith” models into clinical psychotherapy

In the west we had the process of enlightenment, which included something called reductionism. This meant reducing topic areas down into labels.  It is also referred to with similar related terms of Atomism and Positivism.  Before this happened mental health was part of Theology and Philosophy. Later it became psychology.

In other parts of the world, especially the far East, this process never occurred and therefore within Taoism, Kabbalah, Buddhism and other faiths there are also entire psychological theories which do not require faith adherence to use in therapy.

Lets be clear here: you do not have to have any faith at all to benefit from psychology principles taken from Eastern faiths.

Using different models in a clinically effective way

I believe in being holistic, caring and not over medicalised. Treating a label like “depression” is only treating how the person’s overall problem is showing up. It is like giving a head ache pill for a head ache without asking why it happened.

However when working with clients it makes sense to use methods that together BOTH treat the label, AND help the long term well being of the client. Therefore I base my work around research evidenced and NICE recommended core therapies (to address the labels) with psychodynamic and humanistic deeper processes to address the person!

Ironically when I started using mindfulness and other methods they were considered rather alternative, but now they are some of the best research evidenced methods around today.

 

Key words
Mindfulness, faith, multi modal psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, counselling. eastern psychology, western psychology, philosophy of the mind, depression, anxiety, mental health, personal development, disorders, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Falkirk, Scotland, Skype, psychotherapist, psychoanalyst, counsellor

 

NACHP

National Association of Counsellors Hypnotherapists and Psychotherapists. Accredited clinical psychotherapist. Counselling Hypnotherapy Psychotherapy
Psychoanalysis
CBT

National Council of Psychotherapists. Psychotherapy, Counselling, Psychoanalysis, Life Coaching, Hypnotherapy, Psychology, Mental Health

 

 

Ongoing Professional Development

Buddhist and Mindful Psychology

It is a little bit annoying to say the least, as an ordained minister and a Martial Art expert (5th Dan) to have to pander to the western ideas about what mindfulness is! (I’ve trained academically too). I am an ordained minister (multi-faith and humanistic) and am on the FHT Accredited Register under mindfulness. I am a personal practitioner and my 2nd major accreditation was with the NACHP, where the honorary president was a mindfulness within hypnotherapy expert (Yapko).

Mindfulness

Mindfulness is PART of Buddhist, Taoist and Zen based psychology
Multiple Mindfulness certifications

Acceptance

Acceptance is a basic part of the above
Multiple Mindfulness certifications

Compassion

Compassion is a crucial part of the above
Multiple Mindfulness certifications

 

In real Eastern humanistic tradition: there are 3 stages:

  1. Self awareness
  2. Self forgiveness
  3. Self responsibility

So annoying to KEEP hearing reinvented  psychology over and over when it dates back to 4500 BCE!

 

Key Words

Mindfulness, Acceptance, Compassion, Buddhism, Taoism, Zen, Shinto, Paganism, Psychology, Psychotherapy, Counselling, Hypnotherapy, MBCT, MBSR, CBT, CBASP, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Falkirk

Federation of Holistic Therapists. Registered Hypnotherapist and complementary holistic therapist

Federation of Holistic Therapists. Registered Hypnotherapist and complementary holistic therapist: Hypnotherapy, Mindfulness Therapy, EMMETT

National Council of Psychotherapists. Psychotherapy, Counselling, Psychoanalysis, Life Coaching, Hypnotherapy, Psychology, Mental Health

National Council of Psychotherapists. Psychotherapy, Counselling, Psychoanalysis, Life Coaching, Hypnotherapy, Psychology, Mental Health

 

New emphasis on clinical mindfulness

Clinical mindfulness, back to basics

Stuart has been involved in mindfulness since his teens. Beginning with transcendental meditation and self hypnosis, he then studied Taoist meditation and yoga alongside Japanese and Chinese martial arts.

For Stuart, mindfulness is a natural way of life, and in recent years he has studied formally a range of additional courses and CPD certificates to refresh areas of competence.

Stuart has completed clinical mindfulness training for groups, CBT and mindfulness for depression and practical meditation training, as well as certification courses in additional theory. His clinical training has been with NHS and private practice clinicians at courses here in Scotland.

Stuart has run training courses at levels 4 and 5 in mindfulness and uses both active and passive mindfulness in clinical practice in Edinburgh, Falkirk and Glasgow. Methods include MBSR, MBCT, teaching mindfulness and hypnosis based mindfulness.

Key words
Mindfulness, MBSR, MBCT, Teaching mindfulness, meditation, mindfulness for depression, mindfulness for stress, mindfulness for anxiety, psychotherapy, counselling, hypnotherapy, psychoanalysis, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Falkirk, Scotland

Contact via the contact us page HERE

 

Back in Glasgow

Psychotherapy in Glasgow

Glad to announce that after an absence of running clinic in Glasgow for a couple of years due to other commitments, Stuart is now back from the 15th June 2017.

Psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, counselling, hypnotherapy, mindfulness in Glasgow

A full range of therapy models and integrative multi modal therapy work is available again in Glasgow.

Glasgow City Centre Therapy

Therapy is provided from the Consulting Rooms in Glasgow City Centre, near the Queen Street rail station.

 

Key words

Glasgow, psychotherapy, psychotherapist, hypnotherapy, hypnotherapist, counselling, counsellor, hypnosis, hypnotist, mindfulness, MBSR, MBCT, CBT, CBASP, depression, anxiety, psychoanalysis, psychoanalyst, NLP, analysis, psychoanalyst, bipolar, eating disorders, holistic therapy.

Contact via the contact us page HERE

 

Dis-associative Disorders

Psychological therapy for Dis-associative Disorders

Dis-associative disorders are conditions where the sufferer dis-associates for periods of time. What this means in basic terms is they mentally “switch off” or “blank” in a way that may either appear to be day dreaming, or which may just resemble a silent few moments. In more severe cases two other presentations may occur: dis-associating into a different personality, or with a loss of consciousness.

Short blank disassociations

This is the most likely version to be seen, the person reacts to stress or an anxiety trigger by “being elsewhere”. it can also be the result of a flash back being triggered where a historical event is being recalled. The person may appear inattentive, distance, and seem to be ignoring you. This can lead to misunderstanding, conflict and accusations of laziness or inattention, especially in adolescents in education or when it occurs in the workplace. Depending on whether a task is under way at the time, it is possible for this task to be interrupted for a moment, or even, for example, for a cup of tea being made to be split or dropped.

It should be noted that it is very hard to tell these short blanks apart from epileptic “absence” seizures and  it is important to discuss them with your medical doctor and not assume they are psychological in nature.  It should be remembered however that it is more usual for psychological disassociation to be misdiagnosed as epilepsy.

Personality change disassociation

In more severe cases the personality of the sufferer undergoes a change in the disassociated state and a person may appear to have changed in their behaviour, attitude and even in what they believe and remember. What occurs in this state may not be remembered afterwards.

It is a matter of debate whether this is related to schizophrenia or not,  with some sufferers of disassociation adamant that it is a different condition entirely, and some sufferers of schizophrenia claiming that their condition is itself a form of disassociation.

Loss of consciousness disassociation

Often called Non Epileptic Attack Disorder (NEAD) or pseudo-epilepsy,  this is the ultimate disassociation response. The person will loss consciousness and will often shake or spasm as one would expect to see in epilepsy. NEAD is often initially misdiagnosed as epilepsy.

Most people are aware of flight and fight responses to danger. The third response however is that seen in the humble possum. The person loses consciousness, lies still playing dead, the body is flooded by natural pain killers, and for the predator the sufferer / possum appears to be a long dead and unpalatable prey. This state is often associated with loss of bowel or bladder control, again to make the prey smell “off”.  This is a highly primal response to extreme danger.

Causes of disassociation

Disassociation occurs when the sufferer has a history of being faced by traumas such as abuse or rape which can not be coped with at their mental state or age. Thus it is common for these conditions to be present in adult survivors of child sexual abuse or domestic violence. Essentially the subject learns to “opt out” of the situation they are incapable of handling.

Treatment of disassociation

There are two main strategies for addressing disassociative disorders:

1. Increase the sufferer’s ability to cope with stressful situations. This may involve cognitive behavioural therapy to reduce stress response with methods like stress inoculation therapy. It may also involve analysis of interpersonal relationships to adjust perceptions and behaviours which may otherwise lead to conflict. Interpersonal psychotherapy methods, CBASP, CAT or other analytic cognitive behavioural methods might be employed. This is therefore an attempt to use psychoeducation and personal analysis to better manage the condition day to day.

2. Addressing any history of abuse. Addressing PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) as a condition may reduce the underlying effects presented as a disassociative disorder. Psychoanalysis, cognitive behavioural analysis, trauma debriefing such as specialist hypnotherapy “trauma runs” can all be used if appropriate.

Co-morbid presentation

It is common for persons with disassociate disorders to have a history of different diagnosis, and to have elements of different mental health conditions. These might include depression, anxiety, self harm, mood disorders or OCD.

Key words
Disassociation, disassociative disorder, disassociative seizures, NEAD, non epileptic attack disorder, possum response, flight and flight, PTSD, post traumatic attack disorder, sexual abuse, domestic violence, survivor of childhood abuse, child abuse survivor, personality change, mood change, mood disorder, anxiety, depression, OCD, self harm, multiple personalities, multiple personality disorders, loss of memory, stress response, psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, cognitive behavioural analysis, cognitive behavioural therapy, CBASP, CBT, hypnotherapy, counselling, psychotherapist, psychoanalyst, analyst, hypnotherapist, couhsellor, therapy, therapist, psychology, psychologist, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Falkirk, Stirling

Contact via the contact us page HERE